What is IV-D Child Support?

Sometimes the legal term “IV-D” child support comes up in the context of a Connecticut divorce or custody action.  But what is IV-D child support?  How is it significant?

Read on to learn more.

What Does “IV-D” Mean?

In 1975, Congress amended the Social Security Act to add Title IV-D. This amendment mandates that all states establish a program to:

  • locate noncustodial parents
  • establish legal paternity
  • establish and enforce child support obligations
  • and collect, distribute, and disburse support payments.

What is the Purpose of Social Security Act Title Title IV-D?

The Title’s stated purpose is to:

  • provide assistance to needy families so that children may be cared for in their own homes or in the homes of relatives
  • end the dependence of needy parents on government benefits by promoting job preparation, work, and marriage
  • prevent and reduce the incidence of out-of-wedlock pregnancies and establish annual numerical goals for preventing and reducing the incidence of these pregnancies, and
  • encourage the formation and maintenance of two-parent families.

Read: How Do Social Security Payments Work with Child Support and Alimony?

What Can Connecticut’s IV-D Program Do?

In Connecticut, there are two main parts of the IV-D program.  The first part falls under the Office of Child Support Services within the Connecticut Department of Social Services.  The second part is the Support Enforcement Services Unit of Connecticut’s Judicial Branch.

Together they can help:

  • locate noncustodial parents
  • establish legal paternity
  • establish and enforce child support obligations (including contempt of orders)
  • collect, distribute, and disburse support payments
  • modify child support orders if appropriate

Read: How Do I Change My Child Support Payment?

Read: What is a Motion for Contempt?

What Can’t Connecticut’s IV-D Program Do?

The Connecticut IV-D program cannot help you with the following court actions:

The program also cannot provide any legal advice. Additionally, it does not serve as either parent’s attorney and cannot represent either parent.  In other words, the IV-D program is focused on establishing and collecting child support.

Read: How Do You Establish Paternity?

Read: How Do You Add a Name to a Birth Certificate?

Is all CT Child Support IV-D Child Support?

No.  In Connecticut, a child support case is IV-D if (1) the family has received public assistance benefits or (2) a parent filed an application for the IV-D program.  Most people establish paternity and/or child support and enforce and modify court orders without the involvement of the IV-D program.

Next Steps

For more information about Connecticut divorce and family law, check out our Divorce Information and Facts.

If you have questions or want to learn more about how our team of divorce attorneys can help you with your custody or Post Judgment issue, please contact us either here or by phone at 860-530-4221.